The goal of instruction should be to facilitate long-term LEARNING. However, during the instruction or training process, what we can measure is PERFORMANCE, which can be a highly misleading measure of whether actual learning has happened. Watch this video to hear Dr. Robert Bjork (UCLA) discuss the critical distinction between learning and performance, and how improvements in short-term performance can fool us into using poor learning strategies.

 

About the Author

Dr. Robert Bjork (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Psychology at UCLA. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Bjork was a past president of the American Psychological Society (APS), served as Editor for Memory & Cognition and Psychological Review, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Art and Sciences. His research focuses on human learning and memory and on the implications of the science of learning for instruction and training.

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